Art and Humanities Course Listing

Undergraduate

  1 2 3 4 5  ...   

AHS1000 - AHS FOUNDATION

AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

4.00 credits

AHS1001 - HONORS AHS FOUNDATION

HONORS AHS FOUNDATION

4.00 credits

ARB2200 - INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

ARB2200 Introduction to Arabic (formerly ARB1200) 4 credits, General Credit An introduction to the essentials of standard Arabic, the language used in public communications throughout the Arab world. This course introduces students to Arabic sounds, how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, this course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process. Students are also exposed to cultural topics, discussions, and co-curricular opportunities with the goal of exposure to the diverse cultural contexts in which the language is used. (4 credits) Students are strongly encouraged to consider taking Beyond Revolution: Radical Thought in the Middle East (LVA2476) as a complement to this course.

4.00 credits

ARB4610 - ARABIC II: LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND BUSINES

ARABIC II: LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND BUSINES

ARB4610 Elementary Arabic II: Language, Culture and Business 4 credit advanced liberal arts This course is a continuation of Introduction to Arabic 2000 It is intended for students who have successfully completed ARB2200 or its equivalent, or native or heritage speakers who can understand Arabic minimally and produce simple sentences. ARB 4610 is a further study of the Arabic language and Arabic-speaking cultures. It will continue to build Arabic vocabulary, grammar and general communicative competence. It will also stress training in reading and writing short essays, and in enhancing spoken skills necessary for a variety of daily activities. Students will explore the differences between standard Arabic and the dialects used in different regions of the Arab speaking world. As the course progresses, more emphasis will fall on teaching Arabic in business contexts in an interactive and communicative way. This last part of the course will focus on developing students’ abilities in using Arabic in business environments, including commercial, media and financial purposes. Prerequisite: ARB2200

4.00 credits

ARB4640 - ARABIC CINEMA AND CULTURE

ARABIC CINEMA AND CULTURE

ARB4640 Arab Cinema and Culture (formerly ARB4600) 4 credit advanced liberal arts This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. It explores Arab cinema from the colonial period to the present, and provides an in-depth exploration of “cultural identity” and “politics” in the Arab World. Although Egypt is considered the biggest film producer in the Arab world, the course aspires to represent various cinemas across the region, from Morocco and Algeria to Syria, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Palestine, introducing students to notable moments and phenomena in the history of these cinemas. The course will be taught in Arabic and all films will be in Arabic with English subtitle. In addition to film viewings, students will be required to read critical and theoretical articles that pertain to class discussion. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of the Arab world and the Middle East. Films will be on reserve at Horn Library, and screenings will be scheduled. Prerequisites: Students need to be at least at a high intermediate level. This course is open to Advanced and heritage speakers of Arabic.

4.00 credits

ARB4650 - BUSINESS ARABIC

BUSINESS ARABIC

ARB 4650 Business Arabic 4 credit advanced liberal arts This course aims to help students of Arabic to acquire and develop the tools necessary to learn about business in the Arab world from the Arabic media perspective. It introduces students to business vocabularies and helps them practice the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening through extensive use of authentic Arabic business-related materials. Students will learn the specialized structure and vocabulary of business Arabic, beginning with the analysis of headlines and telegraphic language and messaging, and continuing into video, radio, film, and web- based content. They will examine extensive and varied as well as authentic and recent media Arabic materials taken from different Arabic newspapers and media sources such as Al-Hayat, Al- Ahram and Al-Jazeera with a view to introducing them to a variety of stylistic features and terminologies pertaining to the conventional and specialized writing of Arabic business writing. The course will be taught in Arabic. Prerequisites: This course is open to Advanced and heritage speakers of Arabic.

4.00 credits

ART1171 - MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

ART1171 Mixed Media Drawing (General Credit) This is an introductory level course designed to bring students through basic aspects of drawing in a wide range of media. No previous experience is required. Issues such as line, tone, mark making, gesture form, light sources, figure/ground relationships, and perspective to overall compositions will be addressed separately and in the many ways that they relate to one another in a drawing. Students will draw observationally from life and from their own drawings, learning how to use each of these concepts as tools in order to draw and see more analytically. We will work with a wide range of materials from basic graphite pencils and charcoal, to ink washes, conte crayon on gesso treated paper, silverpoint, collage, and printmaking. Slides of various artists' work will be discussed in relation to concepts and processes explored in class. Student work will be discussed in group critiques with full class participation. Students should be committed to expanding their skills and can expect project deadlines. There will be some expense for materials. Prerequisites: NONE This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

ART1172 - INTRO TO SCULPTURE

INTRO TO SCULPTURE

ART1172 Introduction to Sculpture (General Credit) This is an introductory level studio art course designed to engage you with basic sculptural concepts and processes through the creation of your own sculpture. Working with basic material such as plasticene, plaster, wood, and wire, we will learn carving, modeling, and other methods of construction as we explore assignments that parallel historical approaches and processes. As a means of developing a full range of approaches towards making sculpture, we will examine paleo-lithic sculpture; Egyptian, Greek, and Renaissance bas-relief sculpture; abstract, kinetic and minimal sculpture; and installation and conceptual art. Students will be asked to keep a sketchbook for the development and critique of visual ideas. Through visualization, drawing, design, construction, and critique of sculpture, students will expand their skills of observation, critical analysis, and creative problem solving. Prerequisite: NONE This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

ART1174 - INTRO TO PRINTMAKING

INTRO TO PRINTMAKING

ART1174 Introduction to Printmaking 4 Credit General Credit This is a beginning level course that will introduce students to various drawing approaches and printmaking processes. Students will make Monotype, Drypoint, Linocut, and Collograph prints. Each printmaking process will require students to develop particular drawing approaches and techniques under the guidance of the instructor. Attention to line, line quality, surface contour, and cross-hatching will be developed while working on drypoint prints. Shape, tone, and color will be a focus in the creation of their monotypes. Texture and composition will be the focus of linocut and collographic processes. The production of multiples from the original plate requires that students explore a range of approaches to their subject. Bi-weekly critiques allow students to analyze and discuss their work and will assist them in developing their visual communication skills.

4.00 credits

ART1175 - BEGIN PAINTING WATERCOLOR ACRYLIC

BEGIN PAINTING WATERCOLOR ACRYLIC

ART1175 Beginning Painting Watercolor and Acrylic 4 credit (General Credit) This is an introductory level course designed to bring students through basic aspects of drawing in a wide range of media. No previous experience is required. Issues such as line, tone, mark making, gesture form, light sources, figure/ground relationships, and perspective to overall compositions will be addressed separately and in the many ways that they relate to one another in a drawing. Students will draw observationally from life and from their own drawings, learning how to use each of these concepts as tools in order to draw and see more analytically. We will work with a wide range of materials from basic graphite pencils and charcoal, to ink washes, conte crayon on gesso treated paper, silverpoint, collage, and printmaking. Slides of various artists' work will be discussed in relation to concepts and processes explored in class. Student work will be discussed in group critiques with full class participation. Students should be committed to expanding their skills and can expect project deadlines. There will be some expense for materials. Prerequisites: NONE This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

ART3670 - RENAISSANCE ARTS

RENAISSANCE ARTS

4.00 credits

CHI1205 - CHINESE LANG AND CULT FOR GLOBAL PROF

CHINESE LANG AND CULT FOR GLOBAL PROF

CH1205 Chinese Language and Culture for Global Professionals Weina Zhao, MA, Foreign Language Education, Lecturer in Chinese Language In this unique four credit academic experience, you will spend three weeks this summer at Babson and travel for an 8-day international study component in Shanghai. Get immersed in the language and culture of China, enhance your cultural awareness and business communication skills in Chinese (Mandarin), and learn about China’s emergence as a global economic power. Travel Dates: Summer I (Babson: May 20-June 5; China: June 6-15, 2014) Pre-departure Academic Session Dates: 9:00 am- 12:00 pm/May 20th -June 5th, 2014* Babson Electives Abroad Orientation Dates: 12:30 pm- 2:30 pm/May 22nd, 2014* *Attendance required

4.00 credits

CHN1205 - CHINESE LANG CULTUR GLOBL PROF

CHINESE LANG CULTUR GLOBL PROF

CHN1205-01 Chinese Language and Culture for Global Professionals (4 credits) Elective Abroad In this unique four credit academic experience, you will spend three weeks this summer at Babson and travel for an 8-day international study component in Shanghai. Get immersed in the language and culture of China, enhance your cultural awareness and business communication skills in Chinese, and learn about China’s emergence as a global economic power.

4.00 credits

CHN2200 - CHINESE I

CHINESE I

CHN2200 Chinese I (General Credit) An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

CHN4610 - CHINESE II

CHINESE II

CHN4610 Chinese II Advanced Liberal Arts A continuation of the fall semester, an introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: CHN1210 or CHN2200 This course is typically offered Spring semester

4.00 credits

CVA2001 - ETHICS (PHL)

ETHICS (PHL)

CVA2001 Introduction to Ethics (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Discussions relate morality to the life and circumstances of contemporary society by offering a solid grounding in the major concepts of ethical theory and in the basic skills for analyzing ethical issues and making sound moral judgments. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall and Spring semesters.

4.00 credits

CVA2003 - FROM BABSON TO NEW DELHI

FROM BABSON TO NEW DELHI

CVA2003 From Babson to New Delhi: Environmental Justice in the 21st Century 4 credit intermediate liberal arts Offered to students in the BRIC Program.

4.00 credits

CVA2007 - INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

CVA2407 Introduction to Philosophy (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Introduction to Philosophy treats the most basic and pervasive human questions: Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? What is the relationship between our mind and our body? Do human beings have an immortal soul? Do we have free will? What is the difference between a human being and a computer? How can value judgments be justified? What is the proper relationship between the individual and the community? What is the best kind of human life? Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

CVA2012 - SF2 WEST AS FRONTIER IN AMER IMAG

SF2 WEST AS FRONTIER IN AMER IMAG

CVA2411 The West as Frontier in the American Imagination (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this course, we investigate the myths, realities and hopes associated with the American West: that ever-moving frontier of the mind and body where visions of American national identity are invented and celebrated, contested and re-imagined. Our texts will include autobiographies, novels, short stories, historical essays, poems, films, photographs, and other images. Authors may range from Walt Whitman to Willa Cather, from Zitkala-Sa to Sui Sin Far; representations on film may extend from "Chinatown" to "Brokeback Mountain"; in "The Social Network", we can find the American success story in a classic bi-coastal transplant plot, with Silicon Valley as the new frontier. When Horace Greeley issued his famous advice to Civil War veterans, “Go West, young man!”, he went on to say, “Go West, and grow up with the country.” As we will see, the West is still that mythic place where the country is forever young and restless, questioning and creative, inventing the future. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring or Fall

4.00 credits

CVA2019 - GLOBAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

SUMMER INSTITUTE - This course must be taken together with MOB3505 CVA2019 Global Leadership Development 4 credits Intermediate Liberal Arts This Summer Institute is comprised of two courses about the world’s most intractable problems, and about conceptualizing ways to address them. You have chosen an auspicious moment to engage this topic, as the United Nations is currently shifting from its Millennium Development Goals to the new Sustainable Development Goals which will be launched in September 2015. Because Babson is part of the Champions Group of the UN Principles of Responsible Development Education (UN PRME), we have the opportunity to visit and to consult with this branch of the UN on how to translate the new SDGs so that they become relevant to business schools and business students. As such, our course has a certainty urgency and practicality to it that will be reflected in the coursework. And as a Summer Institute, we will travel to NYC to visit the UN, host exciting visitors who are leading in this space, and more! In order to become a global leader, you must understand the context not only of the problems we face on a global level, but also of the partnerships among governments, businesses, NGOs, and concerned global citizens that are created in order to address them: this will be the topic in HUM3605. In order to consider ways to use entrepreneurial thought and action to address those problems, you must learn to clearly identify and scope opportunities, develop feasible and actionable plans to address the opportunities and be able to articulate those plans to various audiences, which will make up the work in MOB3505. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation AH & HS

4.00 credits

  1 2 3 4 5  ...   

​​